Graduate Program

Our department offers a supportive community for students who wish to earn the MA and PhD in philosophy. We have 13 full time faculty and around 25 graduate students. As a graduate student here, you will find a cooperative and constructive approach to philosophy in our broad range of seminars and in informal conversation; a lively intellectual environment in which to explore your ideas and develop your research; and an engaging series of talks and workshops that will expose you to the latest research and allow you to meet people from all over the philosophical world. Most of all, you will find attentive, encouraging, high-quality teaching and advising from respected researchers to help you make the transition from undergraduate to your chosen career.

Graduate students and faculty have office space in Strickland Hall, in the heart of campus, with the library, the bookstore, coffee shops, the gym, and lunch places nearby. Our community is diverse and welcoming. Our current graduate students range in age from their early twenties to their early forties; some are single, some are married, some have children. They come from a variety of countries and a range of economic backgrounds, with some the first in their families to go to college, and others the children of college professors. They share a commitment to philosophy.

If you have questions about the program, see our FAQs page; and take a look at the Graduate School Viewbook

“I'd like to express to you my admiration for your graduate program. My interactions with your students left a very positive impression. I found your students extremely well prepared, eager to discuss the issues, and very well informed. I have seldom had such incisive and rigorous questioning from an audience. I have long been of the opinion that the best graduate programs are those that foster a strong sense of community, where students feel empowered and involved. … I certainly got the feeling that your students consider themselves to be important members of an active and supportive intellectual community.” — Denis Walsh, Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of Biology, University of Toronto